Obama ready to throw his weight at the BcS?

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Out of all the critics of the BcS — and there are many — there’s none that wield more power than The First Fan, President Barack Obama.

Shortly after he was elected in November of 2008, Pres. Obama said during a 60 Minutes interview that he was a proponent of a playoff system and would “throw my weight around a little bit” upon taking office.

“If you’ve got a bunch of teams who play throughout the season and many of them have one loss or two losses, there’s no clear, decisive winner,” Obama said during the interview. “We should be creating a playoff system.”

While The President has been forced to deal with, ahem, a couple of slightly more pressing issues since moving into 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, it looks like his administration may be carving out a little bit of time to deal with the inequities of the current system used to determine a national champion.

The Associated Press has obtained a copy of a letter from Assistant Attorney General Ronald Welch to Utah Senator Orrin Hatch, in which Welch states the Justice Department is looking at the option of opening an investigation into the BcS in order to determine whether the cartel group violate antitrust laws.

During Hatch’s hearing last July, the senator blasted the “arrogance” of the BcS and strongly intimated both during and after the proceedings that the Justice Department should become involved.

“Frankly, there’s an arrogance about the BCS that just drives me nuts,” Hatch said at the time. “Hopefully this hearing will open the door to have some people reconsider their positions. And if nothing else, the Justice Department ought to be looking at this.”

Welch also stated that the administration is looking at several other options, one of which would be charging the Federal Trade Commission to “review the legality of the BcS under consumer protection laws.”

For all of the clout the Senate and House hearings that were held last summer carried, there was — and still is — really only one thing that could potentially force the BcS back on its heels enough to make it more amenable to a playoff system.  And that one thing would be Obama following through on his “threat” and having his administration — particularly the Justice Department — throw the weight of the Oval Office around a little bit.

Hopefully, the threat of that “little bit” will be enough to force the BcS to do what the majority of fans want, and that’s to give everyone a playoff system to determine a national champion.

Ya know, the way they do in every other major collegiate sport.

Either way, you go Obama.  Here’s hoping for change that most college football fans can believe in.

WVU RB Donaldson in concussion protocol, out for Baylor game

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MORGANTOWN, W.Va. (AP) West Virginia running back CJ Donaldson is in concussion protocol and will miss next week’s home game with Baylor after he was injured in a loss to Texas, coach Neal Brown said Tuesday.

Donaldson remained on the ground after he was tackled on a short gain in the third quarter of Saturday’s 38-20 loss to the Longhorns. His helmet and shoulder pads were removed and he was carted off the field on a stretcher. After the game he was cleared to travel home with the team.

“He’s recovering,” Brown said. “There is a strict return-to-play (policy) that we have to follow here and I’m zero involved in it. All I do is ask the question. They don’t even start the return-to-play until they’re symptom free.”

Donaldson, a 240-pound freshman, leads the Mountaineers with 389 rushing yards and six touchdowns, with an average of 6.9 yards per carry.

West Virginia (2-3, 0-2 Big 12 Conference) is idle this week and hosts Baylor (3-2, 1-1) next Thursday, Oct. 13.

Taulia Tagovailoa says he visited brother, Tua, over weekend

Trevor Ruszkowski-USA TODAY Sports
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COLLEGE PARK, Md. – Maryland quarterback Taulia Tagovailoa was able to visit his brother, Tua, last weekend after the Terrapins’ game against Michigan State, he said Tuesday in his first comments to reporters since Tua left the Miami Dolphins’ game against Cincinnati last Thursday with a frightening head injury.

Taulia played in Maryland’s win over Michigan State on Saturday but was not made available to the media afterward. He said Tuesday he was able to go to Florida and spend some time with his brother, who suffered a concussion four days after taking a hit in another game but was cleared to return.

“He’s doing good, everything’s fine,” he said. “My biggest thing was just seeing him and spending as much time as I can with him. I came back Sunday night.”

Tagovailoa said he appreciates the support for his brother.

“My brother’s my heart. He’s someone I look up to, someone I talk to every day,” he said. “It was just a hard scene for me to see that.”

Tagovailoa said he was in constant contact with his mother about his brother’s situation, and he was finally able to talk to Tua on Friday night.

“I really just wanted to go there and just spend time with my family, hug them and stuff like that,” Taulia Tagovailoa said. “But he told me he’s a big fan of us, and he’d rather watch me play on Saturday. … After that phone call, I was happy and getting back to my normal routine.”

Tagovailoa indicated that his brother’s injury didn’t make him too nervous about his own health when he took the field again.

“I guess when that happens to someone like my brother, or when anything happens to one of my family members, I don’t really think of how it will be able to affect me,” he said. “I just think of: `Is he OK? How’s he doing?”‘

Although it was a short visit to Florida, he said he and Tua made the most of their chance to be together.

“I just wanted to make sure he’s healthy and stuff, which he is,” Taulia Tagovailoa said.