Buckeyes report secondary violations from Cirque de Seantrel soap opera

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As much as you may want to, you just simply can’t get away from the tired and played-out soap opera known as Seantrel Henderson.

The latest news surrounding the massive offensive lineman involves Ohio State and their actions during the recruiting process of the former USC signee and current — we think — Miami Hurricane tackle.

By way of a public records request, the Cleveland Plain Dealer reports that Ohio State has self-reported four secondary violations that occurred during the time Henderson was being pursued by the program.  More to the point, current and former Buckeyes were the root cause of the minor issues, as detailed by the Plain Dealer.

• Former Ohio State cornerback Malcolm Jenkins, now with New Orleans Saints, encouraged Henderson to attend Ohio State when asked a question during Super Bowl media day. A video of the request appeared on a Web site. Former players can’t recruit for their old school.

• Current quarterback Terrelle Pryor sent a text message to Henderson telling him to attend Ohio State, as reported in a New York Times story. A Notre Dame player was reported to have done the same thing and Notre Dame filed a similar violation report. Current players can’t recruit for a school that way.

• In an online video, Henderson is seen talking to former OSU receiver Cris Carter during his official visit to Columbus. Again, former players can’t recruit. Another school turned in Ohio State for this incident after viewing the video.

• Henderson and several other recruits walked through the tunnel of fans that line the path from Ohio State’s pep rally at St. John Arena to Ohio Stadium. The recruits didn’t walk with the team, but around the same time, and that was determined to be a secondary violation.

The Buckeyes become the second school to be publicly fingered for committing secondary violations during the recruitment of Henderson; fellow Big Ten member Minnesota also reported several violations involving Henderson.

“When you have a kid that high-profile, the chances of those types of things popping up are much greater,” Chris Rogers, Ohio State’s assistant athletic director for compliance, told the paper. “It’s not like it’s something that’s limited to Ohio State. It happens all the time.”