Welcome to the club: Boise State responds to NCAA allegations

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They may play a “Little Sisters of the Poor” schedule on the field, but off the field Boise State’s seemingly doing everything in their power to prove they belong with the big boys of college football.  Kind of.

The school issued its official response Monday night regarding NCAA violations committed by five of its sports, including secondary ones involving the football program.  The most serious violation involved the women’s tennis program and prompted the NCAA to include the dreaded “lack of institutional control” into the allegations, although it appears likely that hammer will not fall on the football side of the ledger.

On the football side, all of the 63 instances noted by the NCAA involved potential recruits receiving impermissible benefits provided by players who were at the time members of the football program.  The NCAA’s inquiry alleges those impermissible benefits occurred from 2005-2010.

The majority of allegations involve impermissible housing, transportation or meals, where an incoming student-athlete was provided a place to sleep (often on a couch or floor), a car ride or was provided free food by an existing student-athlete.

In football, the NCAA determined that total dollar value over five years was $4,934 for all of the housing, transportation and meals provided to 63 incoming student-athletes. All services ranged from $2.34 to a maximum of $417.55 and have been reimbursed by the student-athletes.

(Yes, you read that correctly; they got dinged in one instance for two dollars and some change.)

As a result of the inquiry, Boise State has, the school wrote in its release, already has implemented several changes to avoid future violations, including the hiring of additional compliance staff, updating policies in its athletics compliance manual, increasing rules education and improving compliance documentation, as well as transferring compliance responsibility and oversight from the athletic department to the President’s Office through the General Counsel.

Boise State filed their official response to the inquiry on April 25, and the Committee on Infractions will hear the school’s response on June 10.

“I am confident we have responded thoroughly to the NCAA. Our internal review was comprehensive and our response was very detailed. We will continue to provide our full cooperation,” BSU president Bob Kustra said in a statement.

“We are deeply committed to following all NCAA rules and to ensuring that our athletic department works diligently so that our procedures reflect the highest standard. I am disappointed that we face these allegations. It is unacceptable, and the athletic department staff understand and agree with my position.”

“Complying with NCAA rules is fundamental to who we are and how we do things at Boise State. We have addressed the issues and are working with the NCAA to bring this to a close,” athletic director Gene Bleymaier said.

WVU RB Donaldson in concussion protocol, out for Baylor game

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MORGANTOWN, W.Va. (AP) West Virginia running back CJ Donaldson is in concussion protocol and will miss next week’s home game with Baylor after he was injured in a loss to Texas, coach Neal Brown said Tuesday.

Donaldson remained on the ground after he was tackled on a short gain in the third quarter of Saturday’s 38-20 loss to the Longhorns. His helmet and shoulder pads were removed and he was carted off the field on a stretcher. After the game he was cleared to travel home with the team.

“He’s recovering,” Brown said. “There is a strict return-to-play (policy) that we have to follow here and I’m zero involved in it. All I do is ask the question. They don’t even start the return-to-play until they’re symptom free.”

Donaldson, a 240-pound freshman, leads the Mountaineers with 389 rushing yards and six touchdowns, with an average of 6.9 yards per carry.

West Virginia (2-3, 0-2 Big 12 Conference) is idle this week and hosts Baylor (3-2, 1-1) next Thursday, Oct. 13.

Taulia Tagovailoa says he visited brother, Tua, over weekend

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COLLEGE PARK, Md. – Maryland quarterback Taulia Tagovailoa was able to visit his brother, Tua, last weekend after the Terrapins’ game against Michigan State, he said Tuesday in his first comments to reporters since Tua left the Miami Dolphins’ game against Cincinnati last Thursday with a frightening head injury.

Taulia played in Maryland’s win over Michigan State on Saturday but was not made available to the media afterward. He said Tuesday he was able to go to Florida and spend some time with his brother, who suffered a concussion four days after taking a hit in another game but was cleared to return.

“He’s doing good, everything’s fine,” he said. “My biggest thing was just seeing him and spending as much time as I can with him. I came back Sunday night.”

Tagovailoa said he appreciates the support for his brother.

“My brother’s my heart. He’s someone I look up to, someone I talk to every day,” he said. “It was just a hard scene for me to see that.”

Tagovailoa said he was in constant contact with his mother about his brother’s situation, and he was finally able to talk to Tua on Friday night.

“I really just wanted to go there and just spend time with my family, hug them and stuff like that,” Taulia Tagovailoa said. “But he told me he’s a big fan of us, and he’d rather watch me play on Saturday. … After that phone call, I was happy and getting back to my normal routine.”

Tagovailoa indicated that his brother’s injury didn’t make him too nervous about his own health when he took the field again.

“I guess when that happens to someone like my brother, or when anything happens to one of my family members, I don’t really think of how it will be able to affect me,” he said. “I just think of: `Is he OK? How’s he doing?”‘

Although it was a short visit to Florida, he said he and Tua made the most of their chance to be together.

“I just wanted to make sure he’s healthy and stuff, which he is,” Taulia Tagovailoa said.