Report: Randy Shannon warned coaches, players about Shapiro

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Now that Yahoo! Sports has officially put the University of Miami’s football program on the NCAA clock, we’re starting to get the fallout and  reactions of the allegations made by former UM booster Nevin Shapiro — denials, personal attacks, eligibility questions and the like — as the media, NCAA and the university alike try to figure out exactly who was involved.

One name who hasn’t been mentioned in such a negative light is former coach Randy Shannon, who coached the Hurricanes through four seasons from 2007-10. It’s already been circulating around the rumor mill that Shannon, upon becoming the head coach for The U, made it abundantly clear he wanted nothing to do with Shapiro, and there’s a new report that reinforces that notion.

CaneSport.com — Miami’s Rivals.com affiliate — writes that Shannon threatened his coaching staff with their jobs if they were associated in any way with Shapiro. Likewise, multiple sources told CaneSport that Shannon told his players on more than one occasion to disassociate themselves from Shapiro in every imaginable way.

From the story:

“When asked by CaneSport to confirm the details provided by another source in attendance for Shannon’s talks at the team meetings, a former Miami football staffer no longer employed by the school responded “Absolutely” when asked if he remembered Shannon specifically telling Miami players to stay away from Shapiro.

Of course, now we know through allegations made by Shapiro that Shannon’s reported pleas may have fallen on deaf ears. Twelve current players on Miami’s roster have been connected to Shapiro through impermissible benefits, and former assistant coaches Clint Hurtt, Jeff Stoutland and Aubrey Hill — all of whom were on Shannon’s staff — allegedly assisted with, or had knowledge of, the activity.

From the sound of it, Shannon was fighting an uphill battle against Shapiro.

“A source close to Shannon also told CaneSport that Shannon had “spies” around town who warned him that Shapiro was getting into problems throughout South Florida and was a booster that he needed to keep away from his players.

“Shannon’s rejection of Shapiro was a touchy issue for former athletic director Kirby Hocutt and individuals responsible for fund raising because Shannon refused to even talk to Shapiro, who for some time could be counted on to write big checks to the department.

“Shapiro would constantly call anybody in the athletic department that would listen and launch into blistering, profanity-laced and racially-charged tirades at the perceived lack of respect he was being shown by the head coach.

If this Rivals story has any merit, Shannon was showing more respect for the program than anyone in the admin’s office.

WVU RB Donaldson in concussion protocol, out for Baylor game

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MORGANTOWN, W.Va. (AP) West Virginia running back CJ Donaldson is in concussion protocol and will miss next week’s home game with Baylor after he was injured in a loss to Texas, coach Neal Brown said Tuesday.

Donaldson remained on the ground after he was tackled on a short gain in the third quarter of Saturday’s 38-20 loss to the Longhorns. His helmet and shoulder pads were removed and he was carted off the field on a stretcher. After the game he was cleared to travel home with the team.

“He’s recovering,” Brown said. “There is a strict return-to-play (policy) that we have to follow here and I’m zero involved in it. All I do is ask the question. They don’t even start the return-to-play until they’re symptom free.”

Donaldson, a 240-pound freshman, leads the Mountaineers with 389 rushing yards and six touchdowns, with an average of 6.9 yards per carry.

West Virginia (2-3, 0-2 Big 12 Conference) is idle this week and hosts Baylor (3-2, 1-1) next Thursday, Oct. 13.

Taulia Tagovailoa says he visited brother, Tua, over weekend

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COLLEGE PARK, Md. – Maryland quarterback Taulia Tagovailoa was able to visit his brother, Tua, last weekend after the Terrapins’ game against Michigan State, he said Tuesday in his first comments to reporters since Tua left the Miami Dolphins’ game against Cincinnati last Thursday with a frightening head injury.

Taulia played in Maryland’s win over Michigan State on Saturday but was not made available to the media afterward. He said Tuesday he was able to go to Florida and spend some time with his brother, who suffered a concussion four days after taking a hit in another game but was cleared to return.

“He’s doing good, everything’s fine,” he said. “My biggest thing was just seeing him and spending as much time as I can with him. I came back Sunday night.”

Tagovailoa said he appreciates the support for his brother.

“My brother’s my heart. He’s someone I look up to, someone I talk to every day,” he said. “It was just a hard scene for me to see that.”

Tagovailoa said he was in constant contact with his mother about his brother’s situation, and he was finally able to talk to Tua on Friday night.

“I really just wanted to go there and just spend time with my family, hug them and stuff like that,” Taulia Tagovailoa said. “But he told me he’s a big fan of us, and he’d rather watch me play on Saturday. … After that phone call, I was happy and getting back to my normal routine.”

Tagovailoa indicated that his brother’s injury didn’t make him too nervous about his own health when he took the field again.

“I guess when that happens to someone like my brother, or when anything happens to one of my family members, I don’t really think of how it will be able to affect me,” he said. “I just think of: `Is he OK? How’s he doing?”‘

Although it was a short visit to Florida, he said he and Tua made the most of their chance to be together.

“I just wanted to make sure he’s healthy and stuff, which he is,” Taulia Tagovailoa said.