Gary Pinkel on Big 12 instability: ‘We all know where it starts’

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And, in Pinkel’s professional opinion, it starts in Austin, travels north on I-35 and ends in Irving.

Appearing on Tim Brando‘s radio show this morning, the Missouri head coach had some not-so-rosy comments about the current state of the Big 12. Earlier this week, Texas A&M officially followed the likes of Nebraska and Colorado, who left for the Big Ten and Pac-12 last summer, respectively, by notifying the conference that it would be withdrawing its membership. An invite to join the SEC is almost surely to follow.

You can listen to Pinkel’s whole interview HERE, but below is the money quote:

“Obviously, we have some issues in our league. When you have Nebraska leave one year. Colorado leaves. Also now Texas A&M. Three really good football teams. … You know, we’ve got some issues. Without question there’s some issues that other leagues don’t have. You don’t hear anything about any other league in the country having these kind of problems. We all know where it starts. Mike Alden’s not the point man here. Dan Beebe is. Dan Beebe’s our commissioner. He’s the guy to ask. I don’t know what they’re going to do. I’m just focusing now on winning the football game. … There’s just no one in the country, no other league in the country, where this stuff goes on. And it’s really a shame because the potential of the league is just so tremendous.

“Anyway, I have no control over it. We’re just trying to beat Miami (Ohio).”

Nice save.

But it’s pretty clear that Pinkel is voicing the displeasure that certainly most other — if not all — Big 12 members feel: that commissioner Dan Beebe catered to Texas’ desire to start the Longhorn Network last summer and the Big 12 is getting weaker by the year because of it.

Interestingly enough, Missouri athletic director Mike Alden, the man who claims Mizzou is committed to the Big 12, had this to say about the LHN:

“I think what it means for us, it means we have to continue to find ways to deliver our product.

I agree; Texas is in no way at fault for starting the LHN. UT has developed their brand into arguably the strongest in college football. Finding ways to monetize it* is called capitalism**.

(*note: although, in fairness, maybe the LHN should pick up some major carriers first…)

(**note: keeping the profits from the players who help bring it in is the greedy part, but that’s another topic for another day)

Beebe made a choice last year to give UT what they wanted because the Big 12 is only as strong as Texas and Oklahoma want it to be. While a potential departure by Missouri would be another devastating blow, the Big 12 can survive as long as Texas and Oklahoma are members.

The conference won’t be as strong or as deep barring some seriously upgraded additions, but it can survive.

Even if the other members don’t like it.

(Big Thanks: Columbia Tribune)

Texas State hires Incarnate Word coach Kinne to lead Bobcats

Chris Jones-USA TODAY Sports
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Texas State hired Incarnate Word coach G.J. Kinne on Friday to lead a Sun Belt program that has had only one winning season since moving up to the Bowl Subdivision in 2012.

The 34-year-old former Tulsa quarterback has made a fast rise in coaching since ending his professional career in 2017.

After three years as an offensive analyst at SMU, Arkansas and the Philadelphia Eagles, Kinne became offensive coordinator at Hawaii in 2020. He held the same role for UCF in 2021 before landing the head coaching job at FCS Incarnate Word this season.

Incarnate Word is 10-1 and averaging 53 points and 8.3 yards per play, both FCS highs, heading into its playoff game Saturday against Furman. Kinne will remain with Incarnate Word through their playoff run.

“It’s with great honor that I’m accepting the call to be next head football coach of the Texas State Bobcats,” Kinne said. “We are going to play fast, have relentless energy, and when the going gets tough, have the mental confidence to win tight games in the second half and represent the state of Texas. Eat ‘Em Up!”

Texas State fired Jake Spavital last week after the Bobcats won just 13 games in his four seasons.

Kinne signed a five-year contract, the school said. Terms were not immediately released.

“My goal was to hire someone with demonstrated leadership experience, success as a head coach, established relationships with Texas football coaches, and success with recruiting and developing players,” said Texas State President Kelly Damphousse. “I sought a leader with a plan to capitalize on our location in the heart of the best high school football in the country.”

Florida Atlantic hires Tom Herman as football coach

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BOCA RATON, Fla. – Former Texas and Houston head coach Tom Herman will take over at Florida Atlantic as it heads into its first season in the American Athletic Conference.

The hire comes just days after FAU fired Willie Taggart, who went 15-18 in his three seasons with the Owls. Details of the contract with Herman were not immediately available.

“We are incredibly excited to welcome Tom Herman to Paradise,” FAU Director of Athletics Brian White said Thursday. “Throughout the process and the more we talked with Coach Herman, the more it became apparent to me that he was the right person to lead our football program. Beyond his knowledge of the game, which is obvious by his success over the years, he also truly cares about the young people in his program.”

FAU’s final season in Conference USA ended with a 5-7 record and an overtime loss to Western Kentucky. The Owls will be in the American next season.

Herman returns to college football after spending the 2021 season with the Chicago Bears as an offensive analyst.

Herman was 22-4 at Houston, a mark that helped him land the head coaching job at Texas where he went 32-18 with four straight bowl trips in 2017-2020. He also was an offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach at Ohio State during the Buckeyes’ 2014 national championship season, as well as stops at Iowa State, Rice and Texas State.

“All the pieces are in place at FAU for us to be successful,” Herman said. “There are already great young men on this team, great facilities, a great location, a great recruiting base and great leadership, all of which are important to building a successful program.”