Reports: FCS-bound Mathieu failed drug tests ahead of LSU boot

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Well, that certainly didn’t take long.

Early Friday afternoon, LSU announced that All-American cornerback Tyrann Matthieu had been dismissed from the Tigers for a violation of team rules, a decision school officials said was made last night.  Well, 24 hours later, Mathieu reportedly has found a new football home.

In a tweet from now-former teammate Josh Jasper, the kicker/punter “reports” that Mathieu has moved on to McNeese State in Louisiana.  The FCS-level school has not confirmed Mathieu’s addition to the roster.

If Jasper is accurate, it would mean that LSU dismissed Mathieu as “eligible” and the defensive back would be permitted to play immediately at his new program.  The move, again if confirmed, would be reminiscent of fellow defensive back and All-SEC performer Janzen Jackson‘s move from Tennessee to the same school in August of last year.

Jackson’s dismissal reportedly stemmed from failed drug tests.

A source with knowledge of the situation told ESPN.com that Mathieu’s dismissal came as a result of what the website calls “repeated violations of LSU’s substance abuse policy for athletes.”  Mathieu, along with two teammates, were suspended for one game last season, reportedly for a failed drug test or tests.

Neither head coach Les Miles nor athletic director Joe Alleva would confirm that failed drug tests resulted in the dismissal, but the latter stated that, whatever violation of school policy led to the boot, it was an ongoing issue.

“This was just a team policy, not going to confirm or deny either way,” Alleva said when asked about failed drug tests. “The policy is a written policy. It’s like the speed limit, if you are going over the speed limit, you’re breaking the law. He’s been over the speed limit. As in, he’s been over it a lot.”

According to LSU’s drug policy for athletes, “[u]p to [a] one-year suspension from all athletic related activities (team practices, weight room, team running, etc…)” and a “one-year suspension from competition” are automatically triggered after a third failed drug test.  A second failed drug test would result in a one-game suspension (15 percent of that sport’s regular season games, rounded down); as mentioned previously, Mathieu was suspended for one game last season, although the reason for the suspension was never confirmed by the school.

Updated 8/11 @ 1:06 p.m. ET: According a release from McNeese State “Mathieu has not made a decision on his intentions and there will be no other comments from McNeese about the issue at this time.” The release did state, however, that the two sides have met.