Miami calls for ‘no additional punitive measures’ from NCAA

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Released earlier today, the independent report into the NCAA’s mishandling of certain aspects of the investigation into the Miami football program seemingly left many more questions than it delivered answers.

Information obtained outside of normal NCAA protocol will be tossed out, as expected, but those hoping for a quasi-mistrial were disappointed as The Association confirmed that the process of investigating allegations of impermissible benefits will go forward.  A scathing response to the report’s findings and the NCAA’s insistence on continuing the probe, though, suggests the university will continue its push for a resolution in the case that comes sooner rather than later and with no additional sanctions — or else.

In Donna Shalala’s scorched-earth statement blasting, in essence, the NCAA’s ineptness, the UM president accused the NCAA of not living “up to their own core principles” in what she described as an “already-flawed investigation” highlighted by “a disappointing pattern of unprofessional and unethical behavior.”  Stressing that there “must be a strong sense of urgency to bring this to closure,” Shalala stated unequivocally that “we believe that this process must come to a swift resolution, which includes no additional punitive measures beyond those already self-imposed.”

Each of the past two seasons, Miami has self-imposed a postseason ban on the football program.

The intimation from Shalala, of course, is that the NCAA could face litigation down the road if further sanctions are imposed.  It’s unclear exactly how the NCAA will react to what’s essentially a (well-deserved) threat from one of its members.

Regardless, below is the full text of Shalala’s statement:

The University takes full responsibility for the conduct of its employees and student-athletes.  Where the evidence of NCAA violations has been substantiated, we have self-imposed appropriate sanctions, including unilaterally eliminating once-in-a-lifetime opportunities for our students and coaches over the past two years, and disciplining and withholding players from competition. 

We believe strongly in the principles and values of fairness and due process. However, we have been wronged in this investigation, and we believe that this process must come to a swift resolution, which includes no additional punitive measures beyond those already self-imposed.

In September 2010—two and a half years ago—the University of Miami advised the NCAA of allegations made by a convicted felon against former players and, at that time, we pledged our full cooperation with any investigation into the matter.  One year later, in August 2011, when the NCAA’s investigation into alleged rules violations was made public, I pledged we would ‘vigorously pursue the truth, wherever that path may lead’ and insisted upon ‘complete, honest, and transparent cooperation with the NCAA from our staff and students.’

The University of Miami has lived up to those promises, but sadly the NCAA has not lived up to their own core principles.  The lengthy and already flawed investigation has demonstrated a disappointing pattern of unprofessional and unethical behavior.  By the NCAA leadership’s own admission, the University of Miami has suffered from inappropriate practices by NCAA staff.   There have also been damaging leaks to the media of unproven charges.  Regardless of where blame lies internally with the NCAA, even one individual, one act, one instance of malfeasance both taints the entire process and breaches the public’s trust. 

There must be a strong sense of urgency to bring this to closure.  Our dedicated staff and coaches, our outstanding student-athletes, and our supporters deserve nothing less.

Reports: Miami hiring Lance Guidry from Tulane as DC

Andrew Weber-USA TODAY Sports
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Miami is hiring Lance Guidry, who was defensive coordinator at Marshall last season and recently accepted the same position at Tulane, to lead its defense, two people with knowledge of the decision told The Associated Press.

The people spoke on condition of anonymity because a deal was still being finalized between Guidry and Miami.

The 51-year-old Louisiana native was hired way from Marshall by Tulane just last month. Now he’ll replace Kevin Steele on Mario Cristobal‘s staff at Miami. Steele is reportedly on his way to Alabama to become Nick Saban‘s defensive coordinator after holding that position for one season with the Hurricanes.

Alabama has yet to make the hiring of Steele and offensive coordinator Tommy Rees official. Rees had been assistant at Notre Dame.

Tulane announced the hiring of Guidry on Jan. 23 to replace Chris Hampton, who left the New Orleans-based school to join Oregon’s staff as an assistant coach.

Guidry’s defenses at Marshall ranked third in the nation in yards per play this season (4.56) and 26th nationally in 2021 (5.14 ypp).

Iowa-Northwestern set for Wrigley Field in November

Nikos Frazier/Journal & Courier/USA TODAY NETWORK
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CHICAGO — Wrigley Field will host a college football game for the third time since 2010 when Iowa plays Northwestern next season.

Northwestern and the Chicago Cubs announced that the Wildcats’ home game will be played Nov. 4.

Northwestern played Illinois at Wrigley in 2010 in the MLB ballpark’s first college football game since 1938, and the Wildcats hosted Purdue there in 2021.

Wrigley Field has a long history of hosting football games. The Chicago Bears played there from 1921 to 1970 before moving to Soldier Field. The old Chicago Cardinals also played at Wrigley, as well as DePaul until its program folded in 1939.

Northwestern had been scheduled to play Wisconsin at Wrigley in 2020, but the game was moved to Ryan Field in Evanston because of the COVID-19 pandemic.