ACC announces grant of rights agreement

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Another summer of realignment rumors looks to be over before it even begins.

First reported by the David Glenn Show, and later confirmed by CBSSports’ Jeremy Fowler and ESPN’s Brett McMuprhy, the ACC has extended the conference’s grant of rights among all 15 members — as in 14 football members and Notre Dame. Specifically, the outlets report that the grant of rights will extend through 2026-27 — the same length as the conference’s exclusive TV deal with ESPN. Additionally, Fowler reports that the ACC’s annual media rights revenue should surpass $20 million per school this year.

The league made the announcement Monday afternoon. Conversations on a conference network are also expected to begin in earnest.

“This announcement further highlights the continued solidarity and commitment by our member institutions,” said ACC Commissioner John Swofford (pictured) in a statement. “The Council of Presidents has shown tremendous leadership in insuring the ACC is extremely well positioned with unlimited potential.”

“The ACC has long been a leader in intercollegiate athletics, both academically and athletically,” said the collective ACC Council of Presidents. “Collectively, we all agree the grant of rights further positions the ACC and its current and future member schools as one of the nation’s premier conferences.”

The move is considered a significant boost to the future stability of the conference, which lost Maryland last fall to the Big Ten and has been fending off rumors for the past year that Florida State, Clemson and/or Virginia may be on their way out as well (the GOR is not expected to impact Maryland’s ongoing litigation with the ACC).

Though the ACC increased its exit fee to over $52 million for departing members, a grant of rights is considered a much stronger metric for stability. Whereas an exit fee is considered liquidated damages and can be negotiated down, a grant of media rights means a school must relinquish its television rights for the length of the agreement.

As The Business of College Sports explains:

In these agreements, all of the conference members grant their television broadcast rights to their athletic contests to the conference for a certain period of time.  If a member leaves the conference during that time, the conference retains the member’s television rights.  Because the value of a school to a conference is the television revenue it can help generate, a grant of rights agreement makes the members essentially worthless to another conference that is looking for new members.

The Big Ten, Big 12 and Pac-12 all have grant of rights in place. Not coincidentally, those three are considered on stable ground. The SEC doesn’t have a GOR, but it would be nothing short of shocking if a member left for another conference.

Point being, the ACC is in a significantly better place with a GOR.

Now, does the latest move halt conference expansion for the foreseeable future? Perhaps, since the list of available schools that would add value is ever dwindling.

WVU RB Donaldson in concussion protocol, out for Baylor game

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MORGANTOWN, W.Va. (AP) West Virginia running back CJ Donaldson is in concussion protocol and will miss next week’s home game with Baylor after he was injured in a loss to Texas, coach Neal Brown said Tuesday.

Donaldson remained on the ground after he was tackled on a short gain in the third quarter of Saturday’s 38-20 loss to the Longhorns. His helmet and shoulder pads were removed and he was carted off the field on a stretcher. After the game he was cleared to travel home with the team.

“He’s recovering,” Brown said. “There is a strict return-to-play (policy) that we have to follow here and I’m zero involved in it. All I do is ask the question. They don’t even start the return-to-play until they’re symptom free.”

Donaldson, a 240-pound freshman, leads the Mountaineers with 389 rushing yards and six touchdowns, with an average of 6.9 yards per carry.

West Virginia (2-3, 0-2 Big 12 Conference) is idle this week and hosts Baylor (3-2, 1-1) next Thursday, Oct. 13.

Taulia Tagovailoa says he visited brother, Tua, over weekend

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COLLEGE PARK, Md. – Maryland quarterback Taulia Tagovailoa was able to visit his brother, Tua, last weekend after the Terrapins’ game against Michigan State, he said Tuesday in his first comments to reporters since Tua left the Miami Dolphins’ game against Cincinnati last Thursday with a frightening head injury.

Taulia played in Maryland’s win over Michigan State on Saturday but was not made available to the media afterward. He said Tuesday he was able to go to Florida and spend some time with his brother, who suffered a concussion four days after taking a hit in another game but was cleared to return.

“He’s doing good, everything’s fine,” he said. “My biggest thing was just seeing him and spending as much time as I can with him. I came back Sunday night.”

Tagovailoa said he appreciates the support for his brother.

“My brother’s my heart. He’s someone I look up to, someone I talk to every day,” he said. “It was just a hard scene for me to see that.”

Tagovailoa said he was in constant contact with his mother about his brother’s situation, and he was finally able to talk to Tua on Friday night.

“I really just wanted to go there and just spend time with my family, hug them and stuff like that,” Taulia Tagovailoa said. “But he told me he’s a big fan of us, and he’d rather watch me play on Saturday. … After that phone call, I was happy and getting back to my normal routine.”

Tagovailoa indicated that his brother’s injury didn’t make him too nervous about his own health when he took the field again.

“I guess when that happens to someone like my brother, or when anything happens to one of my family members, I don’t really think of how it will be able to affect me,” he said. “I just think of: `Is he OK? How’s he doing?”‘

Although it was a short visit to Florida, he said he and Tua made the most of their chance to be together.

“I just wanted to make sure he’s healthy and stuff, which he is,” Taulia Tagovailoa said.