Mark Emmert apparently doesn’t know how the FCS playoffs work

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This is not a good look, Mark Emmert.  This is not a good look at all.

The NCAA president has come under fire for his stance on the name-image-likeness issue.  In the midst of the coronavirus pandemic, he was lampooned for his organization’s handling of the situation.  In general, Emmert’s stewardship, such as it is, has led to renewed calls for a commissioner to oversee college football.

And now this.

In an interview with ESPN.com, Emmert expressed a great deal of concern about the ability of fall sports to go off as scheduled.  Rightly so, the NCAA head thinks that a delayed start to fall sports, including football, as well as a shortened schedule would be optimal.

At one point, though, the conversation with the Worldwide Leader turned to the FCS playoff.  And Mark Emmert stepped in it.  And tripped over it.  Basically, impressively Three Stooging his response as a solo act.

An individual contest — a football game, a basketball game — that’s quite different. In the case of a bowl game or the CFP, you’re talking about a championship game. Can you create a bubble with enough lead time to have two teams play each other safely? The answer to that may be yes. The FCS is a round-robin championship with 20 teams participating and a full-on championship event. That’s a very different and much more challenging environment than adding one or two more games to a season with a lot of space in between.

Two things.  One, the Football Championship Series utilizes a single-elimination playoff.  Not a round-robin championship.  Two, there are 24 teams participating (10 automatic bids, 14 at-large).  Not 20.  And it’s been two dozen since 2013.

Actually, a third as well: I’m assuming that Heather Dinich transcribed Emmert’s own words very, very accurately.

Fortunately for all involved, the NCAA in general and Emmert specifically has no control over the FBS postseason.  None at all.  You know, that 10-team Bowl Championship Series that decides the national champion of major college football…